New Book Series edited by CEERES Associate, William Benton Whisenhunt

Americans in Revolutionary Russia is focused on bringing back into print the observations and experiences of Americans who were witnesses to war and revolution in Russia between 1914 and 1921. There were numerous accounts by Americans from a variety of perspectives. These men and women offer a rich perspective on the tumultuous events that gripped Russia during this time. Most of these books have not been republished since they were first issued a hundred years ago. This series offers new editions of these works with an expert introduction, textual notation, and an index.

Published Volumes:

Russian People: Revolutionary Recollections
Princess Julia Cantacuzène Countess Spéransky née Grant
Edited by Norman E. Saul

Born in the White House in 1876, Julia Grant, granddaughter of President Ulysses S. Grant, had a life of adventure that included her marriage into the Cantacuzène family in 1900, and a move to Russia.  Her book gives the reader a firsthand account of Russia during World War I and recounts her travels across the empire, where she saw the horrors of war, revolution, and civil war only to escape to Finland to avoid the danger that many Russian nobles faced. Throughout her work, she expressed admiration for the cultures of Russian and non-Russian peoples of the empire.

Through the Russian Revolution
Albert Rhys Williams
Edited and introduced by William Benton Whisenhunt

Through the Russian Revolution by Albert Rhys Williams, a Congregationalist pastor-turned-labor-organizer-and-journalist, offers readers a first-hand account of the exciting and confusing events of the Russian Revolution from June 1917 to August 1918. Williams, a lifelong defender of the Soviet system, documented his first adventure in Russia at its most chaotic moments. There he formed a lasting impression of what he thought the Soviet system could offer to the world and dedicated the rest of his life to this cause. His account, while sympathetic, reveals to a modern audience the inner workings of the Bolshevik Party, life in Petrograd and the countryside, and an optimistic vision of the revolutionary future.