Area Studies Showcase Lecture Series: Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia

Event web header

This lecture series is a collaborative effort to showcase an area studies specialist from each center focusing on the Russian, East European, and Central Asian world region. The series is sponsored by the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University; the Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley; the Russian, East European & Eurasian Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; the Russian and East European Institute at Indiana University; the Center for Russian, East European, & Eurasian Studies at the University of Michigan; the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin; the Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center at Indiana University; the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies at the University of Pittsburgh; the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia at the University of Wisconsin - Madison; the Center for East European and Russian/Eurasian Studies at The University of Chicago; and the Center for Slavic and East European Studies at The Ohio State University.

Each center will host their own lecture via their personal social media channels. Please contact the host center for any necessary accommodations. Click register on any lecture to go to that center’s webpage for more information. If you miss a lecture, it will be available online afterwards through the host center.

Imagining the Next Global Economy

Rawi Abdelal
Tuesday, September 15 
2PM EST | 1PM CST | 11AM PST

Register

Description: 
There is no going back to the beginning. The emerging global economy will not resemble the system that came before. That pre-pandemic system was already fragile. Now we have an opportunity to imagine a new global economy.

Speaker:
Dr. Rawi Abdelal is the Herbert F. Johnson Professor of International Management at Harvard Business School and is the Director of the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. His primary expertise is international political economy, and his research focuses on the politics of globalization and the political economy of Eurasia. Professor Abdelal is the author of National Purpose in the World Economy and Capital Rules, and the editor or co-edited of The Rules of Globalization, a collection of Harvard Business School cases on international business; Measuring Identity; and Constructing the International Economy. Abdelal is currently at work on two projects: the first explores the inter-related challenges that undermined the first era of globalization, circa 1870-1914, and which threaten to destroy the current age of global capitalism, and the second explores the geopolitics of energy in Europe and Eurasia. Abdelal earned an M.A. and Ph.D. in Government from Cornell University.

The Caucasus: From Geopolitics to Geopoetics

Harsha Ram
Tuesday, September 22
2PM EST | 1PM CST | 11AM PST

Register

Speaker: 
Harsha Ram, Associate Professor, Departments of Slavic Languages and Literatures and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley

Anatomy of a Successful Forgery: The Czech Manuscripts

David Cooper
Tuesday, September 29
2PM EST | 1PM CST | 11AM PST

Register

Speaker: 
David Cooper, Associate Professor, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

American Literary and Cultural Diplomacy during the Cold War: Kurt Vonnegut in the USSR

Sarah Phillips
Wednesday, October 7
2PM EST | 1PM CST | 11AM PST

Register

Speaker: 
Sarah Phillips, Professor of Anthropology; Director of the Russian and East European Institute, Indiana University

Aging Nationally in Contemporary Poland: Memory, Kinship, and Personhood

Jessica Robbins
Wednesday, October 14
2PM EST | 1PM CST | 11AM PST

Register

Description:
Active aging programs that encourage older adults to practice health-promoting behaviors are proliferating worldwide. In Poland, the meanings and ideals of these programs have become caught up in the sociocultural and political-economic changes that have occurred during the lifetimes of the oldest generations—most visibly, the transition from socialism to capitalism. Yet practices of active aging resonate with older forms of activity in late life in ways that exceed these narratives of progress. Moreover, some older Poles come to live valued, meaningful lives in old age despite threats to respect and dignity posed by illness and debility. Drawing on almost two years of ethnographic research with older Poles in a range of contexts, this talk shows that everyday practices of remembering and relatedness shape how older Poles come to be seen by themselves and by others as living worthy, valued lives. This talk shows how memories and understandings of the Polish nation intersect with ideals and experiences of late life to produce forms of life that are not reducible to binary categories of health or illness, independence or dependence, or socialism or capitalism.

Speaker: 
Jessica Robbins is an assistant professor at the Institute of Gerontology and Department of Anthropology at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. She received her Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Michigan, and her B.A. in anthropology and music from Williams College. Her research explores aging, memory, kinship, and personhood in historical political-economic perspective, in both Poland and Michigan. Her research has been published in journals such as Medical Anthropology Quarterly, Ageing & Society, Journal of Aging Studies, and East European Politics, Societies & Cultures. Her first book, Aging Nationally in Contemporary Poland: Memory, Kinship, and Personhood, is forthcoming later this year with Rutgers University Press. She has received funding from organizations such as the NSF, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, IREX, and the Wilson Center.

 

Outsiders, Others, and Outcasts: Examining antiziganism and race-making in Albania

Chelsi West Ohueri
Wednesday, October 21
2PM EST | 1PM CST | 11AM PST

Register

Description:
In this talk I explore the contours of antiziganism, conceptualized as racism and prejudice against Romani people groups, in Albania and the Balkan region. Part one of the presentation considers the theoretical framings of antiziganism and asks how analyses of antiblackness can allow scholars to think through contemporary manifestations of antiziganism in the Balkan region. Part two of the talk explores whiteness in relation to antiziganism and antiblackness. In doing so, I draw attention to the ways that Albanians have been racialized and othered as outcasts and outsiders both within Europe and the Balkans, and ask how this broadly shapes our understandings of whiteness and regional racialization.  

Speaker:
Chelsi West Ohueri, Assistant Professor of Slavic & Eurasian Studies, The University of Texas at Austin

Jobs for Orphans, Taxes for Kulaks, and Love of Tractors: Collectivization Oral Histories from Uzbekistan

Marianne Kamp
Wednesday, October 28
2PM EST | 1PM CST | 11AM PST

Register

Speaker:
Marianne Kamp, Associate Professor of Central Eurasian Studies, Indiana University

Musical Evolution and The Other: State-Sponsored Musical Evolutionism in the USSR and the Conundrum of Post-Soviet Crimean Tatar Indigenous Music

Maria Sonevytsky
Thursday, November 5
2PM EST | 1PM CST | 11AM PST

Register

Speaker:
Maria Sonevytsky, Assistant Professor of Music, University of California, Berkeley

Ukrainian Nationalism in the Age of Extremes

Dr. Trevor Erlacher
Thursday, November 12
2PM EST | 1PM CST | 11AM PST

Register

Speaker:
Dr. Trevor Erlacher, Academic Advisor at the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, University of Pittsburgh

Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg: Revisiting the International Military Tribunal on its 75th Anniversary

Francine Hirsch
Thursday, November 19
5PM EST | 4PM CST | 2PM PST

Register

Speaker:
Francine Hirsch, Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of History, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Utopia’s Discontents: Russian Émigrés and the Quest for Freedom

Faith Hillis
Thursday, December 3
2PM EST | 1PM CST | 11AM PST

Register

Speaker:
Associate Professor of Russian History and the College, The University of Chicago

The Cold War from the Margins: Socialist Bulgaria on the Global Cultural Scene

Theodora Dragostinova
Thursday, December 10
2PM EST | 1PM CST | 11AM PST

Register

Description:
Presenting Bulgaria’s cultural engagements with multiple actors in the Third World, this talk highlights the global reach of state socialism, demonstrates the existence of vibrant partnerships along an East-South axis during the 1970s, and challenges notions of late socialism as the prelude to communist collapse in eastern Europe.

Speaker:
Theodora Dragostinova is an Associate Professor of History at Ohio State University whose work focuses on nationalism, migration, global history, and Cold War culture. She is the author of Between Two Motherlands: Nationality and Emigration among the Greeks in Bulgaria, 1900-1949 (Cornell University Press, 2011) and coeditor of Beyond Mosque, Church, and State: Alternative Narratives of the Nation in the Balkans (CEU Press, 2016) and the thematic cluster, “Beyond the Iron Curtain: Eastern Europe and the Global Cold War,” Slavic Review (2018). Her most recent book, The Cold War from the Margins: A Small Socialist State on the Global Cultural Scene, is forthcoming by Cornell University Press in 2021.

 

showcase flier