Eastern Europe

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Studying Eastern Europe at The University of Chicago

The University of Chicago offers numerous courses at the graduate and undergraduate level on the history and culture of Eastern Europe. On this page you will find featured courses studying Eastern Europe as well as related news and upcoming events. For information about particular Eastern European languages that are offered by The University of Chicago please see our Languages of Study menu. 

Related Courses

REES 27019/37019 Holocaust Object

(ANTH 35035, HIST 33413, JWSC 29500)

In this course, we explore various ontological and representational modes of the Holocaust material object world as it was represented during World War II. Then, we interrogate the post-Holocaust artifacts and material remnants, as they are displayed, curated, controlled, and narrated in the memorial sites and museums of former ghettos and extermination and concentration camps. These sites which-once the locations of genocide-are now places of remembrance, the (post)human, and material remnants also serve educational purposes. Therefore, we study the ways in which this material world, ranging from infrastructure to detritus, has been subjected to two, often conflicting, tasks of representation and preservation, which we view through a prism of authenticity. In order to study representation, we critically engage a textual and visual reading of museum narrations and fiction writings; to tackle the demands of preservation, we apply a neo-materialist approach. Of special interest are survivors' testimonies as appended to the artifacts they donated. The course will also equip you with salient critical tools for future creative research in Holocaust studies.

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Eastern Europe

REES 27026/37026 Kieslowski: The Decalogue

(CMST 26705, CMST 36705, FNDL 24003)

In this course, we study the monumental series "The Decalogue" by one of the most influential filmmakers from Poland, Krzysztof Kieślowski. Without mechanically relating the films to the Ten Commandments, Kieślowski explores the relevance of the biblical moral rules to the state of modern man forced to make ethical choices. Each part of the series contests the absolutism of moral axioms through narrative twists and reversals in a wide, universalized sphere. An analysis of the films will be accompanied by readings from Kieślowski's own writings and interviews, including criticism by Zizek, Insdorf, and others. 

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Eastern Europe

REES 29013/39013 The Burden of History: The Nation and Its Lost Paradise

(CMLT 23401, CMLT 33401, HIST 24005, HIST 34005, NEHC 20573. NEHC 30573)

What makes it possible for the imagined communities called nations to command the emotional attachments that they do?  This course considers some possible answers to Benedict Anderson’s question on the basis of material from the Balkans. We will examine the transformation of the scenario of paradise, loss, and redemption into a template for a national identity narrative through which South East European nations retell their Ottoman past.  With the help of Žižek’s theory of the subject as constituted by trauma and Kant’s notion of the sublime, we will contemplate the national fixation on the trauma of loss and the dynamic between victimhood and sublimity.

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Eastern Europe

REES 29024/39024 States of Surveillance

(CMLT 29024, CMLT 39024)

What does it feel to be watched and listened to all the time? Literary and cinematic works give us a glimpse into the experience of living under surveillance and explore the human effects of surveillance--the fraying of intimacy, fracturing sense of self, testing the limits of what it means to be human. Works from the former Soviet Union (Solzhenitsyn, Abram Tertz, Andrey Zvyagintsev), former Yugoslavia (Ivo Andrić, Danilo Kiš, Dušan Kovačević), Romania (Norman Manea, Cristian Mungiu), Bulgaria (Valeri Petrov), and Albania (Ismail Kadare).

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Eastern Europe
Russia