Courses

Although the center itself does not offer courses, we work each quarter to compile a list of courses related to the center's regions and languages of study. In addition, we have designed the category dropdown menu below to allow users to sort classes by region or country in the hope that it will help students in identifying area studies classes that might be of interest irrespective of discipline. 

For instructors who think their course should be included below please contact us here

YDDH 10100 Elementary Yiddish for Beginners I

In this course, students will develop basic speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in Yiddish.  By the end of the course, students should be able to understand and participate in a conversation on a variety of everyday topics, read simple texts, be prepared to tackle more complex texts with the aid of a dictionary, and write short compositions on a variety of everyday topics.  The course will also introduce students to the history of the Yiddish language and culture.
 

2020-2021 Autumn

ARME 10101 Elementary Modern Armenian I

This three-quarter sequence focuses on the acquisition of speaking, listening, reading and basic writing skills in modern formal and spoken Armenian. The course utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet and the basic grammatical structures to communicate their basic needs in Armenian, understand simple texts and to achieve a minimal level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian.

A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or related fields, or to pursue work in Armenia. A language competency exam is offered at the end of spring quarter for those taking this course as college language requirement.

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Eurasia

TURK 10101 Elementary Turkish I

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing grammar in modern Turkish. This sequence consists of reading and listening comprehension, as well as grammar exercises and basic writing in Turkish. Modern stories and contemporary articles are read at the end of the courses.

2020-2021 Autumn

RUSS 10103 First-Year Russian I

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This year-long course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

 

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

CZEC 10103 First-Year Czech I

This course introduces the Czech language to those students who would like to speak Czech or use the language for reading and research purposes. All four major communicative skills (i.e. reading, writing, listening, speaking) are stressed. Students will also learn about Czech culture through readings, films and class activities. This three- quarter sequence prepares students for the second-year Czech course and to study or travel abroad in the Czech Republic. Conversation practice is held weekly.

2020-2021 Autumn

POLI 10103 First-Year Polish I

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

2020-2021 Autumn

BCSN 10103 First-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I

This three-quarter sequence course in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian languages introduces students to the basics of four basic skills: reading, listening, speaking and writing. It maintains a good balance of the three languages, their respective grammatical and lexical differences, and the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. Students are encouraged to concentrate on the language and culture of their interest and choice. The course objective is to build a solid foundation in the grammatical patterns of the spoken and written languages, while simultaneously working on basic interpretive, interpersonal, presentational and intercultural communication. This is achieved through a communicative situation-based approach, dialogues and texts and, reinforced by the students and instructor, screenings of short announcements, commercials, documentaries, interviews, and the like. Once a week, one-on-one 15-minute conversation sessions with the instructor offer students the opportunity to review and practice the materials presented in class. The course is supplemented with cultural events, guest speakers and selected media. Together with the conversation sessions, these supplements improve the students’ ability to interact effectively and appropriately with people from other linguistic and cultural backgrounds— essential for establishing successful, positive relationships across cultural boundaries.

2020-2021 Autumn

RUSS 10400 Russian Through Pushkin I

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin's shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Russia

REES 13802 The Russian Empire

(HIST 13802)

Empire is back in contemporary Russia. Old imperial insignia have replaced hammers and sickles on government buildings, the bodies of the last tsar and his family have been exhumed and venerated, and Putin's foreign policy stakes imperial claims on the nations on Russia's border. This course examines what the Russian empire was, how it worked, and the legacies that it left behind. Themes to be considered include the culture of the autocracy and the tradition of reform from above; imperial expansion and multiethnic society; the construction of class, ethnic, and estate identities; and the causes and consequences of the Old Regime's collapse. Mondays and Wednesdays are reserved for lectures, Fridays for discussion. Note(s): First-year students warmly welcomed; no prior Russian history, culture, or language assumed.

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Russia

ARME 20101 Intermediate Modern Armenian I

The course is aiming to enable students to reach a reasonable level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The curriculum is heavily based on real life situations. Each class session includes a healthy balance of real-life like conversations (shopping, placing an order in a restaurant, asking directions, talking with natives, getting around in the city, banking, etc.), readings (e-mails, text messages, ads, news, etc.) and writings (messages, filling forms, etc). The students can also communicate in Armenian well beyond basic needs about the daily life and obtain some level of fluency in their professional interests. This sequence covers a wider-range vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments also include a selection of simple original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media.

ARME 10103 or an equivalent

2020-2021 Autumn

TURK 20101 Intermediate Turkish I

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing speaking and writing skills as well as reading and listening comprehension at the intermediate to advanced levels in modern Turkish. Modern short stories, novel excerpts, academic and journalistic articles form the basis for an introduction to modern Turkish literature. Cultural units consisting of films and web-based materials are also used extensively in this course, which is designed to bring the intermediate speaker to an advanced level of proficiency.

TURK 10103, or equivalent with intermediate level proficiency test

2020-2021 Autumn

POLI 20103 Second-Year Polish I

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

POLI 10300 or equivalent; drills to be scheduled

2020-2021 Autumn

BCSN 20103 Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I

The Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian languages and cultures course is designed for both students who have completed the first- year sequence and heritage learners. Its main objective is to develop further communicative skills—interpretive, interpersonal, presentational and intercultural—using authentic materials representing the contemporary spoken and written language in authentic cultural contexts. Students are presented with a series of texts, such as newspaper articles, interviews with writers, actors, athletes, short biographies, book and film reviews, university websites, travel blogs, etc. Audiovisual materials, representing both high and popular culture, constitute an integral part of every unit. Grammar and vocabulary are reinforced and developed throughout the quarter. Textual and audiovisual materials are selected to best exemplify the outlined themes while maintaining a good balance of the three languages and their respective grammatical and lexical differences in order to assess students’ progress in all four skills. Each of the 12 units is accompanied with a unit test, all of which, including the final exam at the end of the term, mirror the tasks in the practical proficiency assessment test that students can take at the end of the spring quarter. The course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans, guest speakers and cultural events. The prerequisite is BCSN 10303 or the equivalent. 

BCSN 10303 or consent of instructor. 

2020-2021 Autumn

RUSS 20103 Second-Year Russian I

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

 

RUSS 10303 or equivalent 

2020-2021 Autumn

CZEC 20103 Second Year Czech-I

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

2020-2021 Autumn

RUSS 20702 Third-Year Russian through Culture I

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20300 (two years of Russian) or equivalent

2020-2021 Autumn

REES 26011 Introduction to Russian Civilization I

(HIST 13900; SOSC 24000)

The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources-from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces-we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Russia

TURK 30101 Advanced Turkish I

Advanced Turkish students will develop their language skills in speaking, reading, translating, listening, and writing, while learning about Turkish society and culture at the same time. To address all of these aspects each class is divided into three sections which focuses on a specific skill.

TURK 20103, or equivalent with intermediate level proficiency test

2020-2021 Autumn

TURK 30501 Ottoman Turkish I

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

2 years of Turkish, or equivalent

2020-2021 Autumn

ARME 10102 Elementary Modern Armenian II

This three-quarter sequence focuses on the acquisition of speaking, listening, reading and basic writing skills in modern formal and spoken Armenian. The course utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet and the basic grammatical structures to communicate their basic needs in Armenian, understand simple texts and to achieve a minimal level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or related fields, or to pursue work in Armenia. A language competency exam is offered at the end of spring quarter for those taking this course as college language requirement.

ARME 10101 or an equivalent

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Eurasia

TURK 10102 Elementary Turkish II

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing grammar in modern Turkish. This sequence consists of reading and listening comprehension, as well as grammar exercises and basic writing in Turkish. Modern stories and contemporary articles are read at the end of the courses.

TURK 10101

2020-2021 Winter

YDDH 10200 Elementary Yiddish for Beginners II

In this course, students will extend basic Yiddish speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.  By the end of the course, students should have a basic understanding of regional Yiddish variations in pronunciation and spelling, be able to understand and participate in a conversation in an increasingly comfortable and complex way, read simple texts with ease, have experience tackling more complex texts with the aid of a dictionary, and write short compositions with grammatical complexity.  In the course of language study, students will also be exposed to key topics in the history of the Yiddish language and culture.

YDDH 10200 or consent of language coordinator.

2020-2021 Winter

RUSS 10203 First-Year Russian II

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All five major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening, comprehension, and speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

 

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

CZEC 10203 First-Year Czech II

This course introduces the Czech language to those students who would like to speak Czech or use the language for reading and research purposes. All four major communicative skills (i.e. reading, writing, listening, speaking) are stressed. Students will also learn about Czech culture through readings, films and class activities. This three- quarter sequence prepares students for the second-year Czech course and to study or travel abroad in the Czech Republic. Conversation practice is held weekly.

2020-2021 Winter

POLI 10203 First-Year Polish II

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. Drill sessions to be arranged.

2020-2021 Winter

BCSN 10203 First-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II

This three-quarter sequence course in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian languages introduces students to the basics of four basic skills: reading, listening, speaking and writing. It maintains a good balance of the three languages, their respective grammatical and lexical differences, and the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. Students are encouraged to concentrate on the language and culture of their interest and choice. The course objective is to build a solid foundation in the grammatical patterns of the spoken and written languages, while simultaneously working on basic interpretive, interpersonal, presentational and intercultural communication. This is achieved through a communicative situation-based approach, dialogues and texts and, reinforced by the students and instructor, screenings of short announcements, commercials, documentaries, interviews, and the like. Once a week, one-on-one 15-minute conversation sessions with the instructor offer students the opportunity to review and practice the materials presented in class. The course is supplemented with cultural events, guest speakers and selected media. Together with the conversation sessions, these supplements improve the students’ ability to interact effectively and appropriately with people from other linguistic and cultural backgrounds— essential for establishing successful, positive relationships across cultural boundaries.

2020-2021 Winter

RUSS 10500 Russian through Pushkin II

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Russia

KAZK 10502 Intro to Turkic Languages II

(UZBK 10502; TURK 10502)

The second quarter of a two-section course in which Elementary Kazakh and Elementary Uzbek will be offered as one class, with the option for students to study one or the other, or both simultaneously.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Eurasia

ARME 20102 Intermediate Modern Armenian II

The course is aiming to enable students to reach a reasonable level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The curriculum is heavily based on real life situations. Each class session includes a healthy balance of real-life like conversations (shopping, placing an order in a restaurant, asking directions, talking with natives, getting around in the city, banking, etc.), readings (e-mails, text messages, ads, news, etc.) and writings (messages, filling forms, etc). The students can also communicate in Armenian well beyond basic needs about the daily life and obtain some level of fluency in their professional interests. This sequence covers a wider-range vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments also include a selection of simple original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media.

ARME 20101 or the equivalent

2020-2021 Winter

TURK 20102 Intermediate Turkish II

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing speaking and writing skills as well as reading and listening comprehension at the intermediate to advanced levels in modern Turkish. Modern short stories, novel excerpts, academic and journalistic articles form the basis for an introduction to modern Turkish literature. Cultural units consisting of films and web-based materials are also used extensively in this course, which is designed to bring the intermediate speaker to an advanced level of proficiency.

2020-2021 Winter

POLI 20203 Second-Year Polish II

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

2020-2021 Winter

BCSN 20203 Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II

The Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian languages and cultures course is designed for both students who have completed the first- year sequence and heritage learners. Its main objective is to develop further communicative skills—interpretive, interpersonal, presentational and intercultural—using authentic materials representing the contemporary spoken and written language in authentic cultural contexts. Students are presented with a series of texts, such as newspaper articles, interviews with writers, actors, athletes, short biographies, book and film reviews, university websites, travel blogs, etc. Audiovisual materials, representing both high and popular culture, constitute an integral part of every unit. Grammar and vocabulary are reinforced and developed throughout the quarter. Textual and audiovisual materials are selected to best exemplify the outlined themes while maintaining a good balance of the three languages and their respective grammatical and lexical differences in order to assess students’ progress in all four skills. Each of the 12 units is accompanied with a unit test, all of which, including the final exam at the end of the term, mirror the tasks in the practical proficiency assessment test that students can take at the end of the spring quarter. The course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans, guest speakers and cultural events. The prerequisite is BCSN 10303 or the equivalent. 

2020-2021 Winter

RUSS 20203 Second-Year Russian II

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategics are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practices is held twice a week.

 

2020-2021 Winter

CZEC 20203 Second Year Czech-II

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

2020-2021 Winter

RUSS 20802 Third-Year Russian through Culture II

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

2020-2021 Winter

TURK 30102 Advanced Turkish II

Advanced Turkish students will develop their language skills in speaking, reading, translating, listening, and writing, while learning about Turkish society and culture at the same time. To address all of these aspects each class is divided into three sections which focuses on a specific skill.

2020-2021 Winter

TURK 30502 Ottoman Turkish II

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

2020-2021 Winter

ARME 10103 Elementary Modern Armenian III

This three-quarter sequence focuses on the acquisition of speaking, listening, reading and basic writing skills in modern formal and spoken Armenian. The course utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet and the basic grammatical structures to communicate their basic needs in Armenian, understand simple texts and to achieve a minimal level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or related fields, or to pursue work in Armenia. A language competency exam is offered at the end of spring quarter for those taking this course as college language requirement.

ARME 10102 or an equivalent

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Eurasia

TURK 10103 Elementary Turkish III

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing grammar in modern Turkish. This sequence consists of reading and listening comprehension, as well as grammar exercises and basic writing in Turkish. Modern stories and contemporary articles are read at the end of the courses.

TURK 10102

2020-2021 Spring

YDDH 10300 Elementary Yiddish for Beginners III

In this course, students will acquire intermediate Yiddish speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.   By the end of the course, students should be able to conduct a conversation on a wide range of topics, be comfortable tackling complex texts with the aid of a dictionary, and write short compositions with grammatical complexity.  In the course of language study, students will also be exposed to key topics in the history of the Yiddish language and culture.  Students will also be introduced to basic Yiddish research skills.
 

YDDH 10200 or placement or consent of language coordinator.

2020-2021 Spring

RUSS 10303 First-Year Russian III

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

 

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

CZEC 10303 First-Year Czech III

This course introduces the Czech language to those students who would like to speak Czech or use the language for reading and research purposes. All four major communicative skills (i.e. reading, writing, listening, speaking) are stressed. Students will also learn about Czech culture through readings, films and class activities. This three- quarter sequence prepares students for the second-year Czech course and to study or travel abroad in the Czech Republic. Conversation practice is held weekly.

2020-2021 Spring

POLI 10303 First-Year Polish III

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

2020-2021 Spring

BCSN 10303 First-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

This three-quarter sequence course in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian languages introduces students to the basics of four basic skills: reading, listening, speaking and writing. It maintains a good balance of the three languages, their respective grammatical and lexical differences, and the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. Students are encouraged to concentrate on the language and culture of their interest and choice. The course objective is to build a solid foundation in the grammatical patterns of the spoken and written languages, while simultaneously working on basic interpretive, interpersonal, presentational and intercultural communication. This is achieved through a communicative situation-based approach, dialogues and texts and, reinforced by the students and instructor, screenings of short announcements, commercials, documentaries, interviews, and the like. Once a week, one-on-one 15-minute conversation sessions with the instructor offer students the opportunity to review and practice the materials presented in class. The course is supplemented with cultural events, guest speakers and selected media. Together with the conversation sessions, these supplements improve the students’ ability to interact effectively and appropriately with people from other linguistic and cultural backgrounds— essential for establishing successful, positive relationships across cultural boundaries.

2020-2021 Spring

KAZK 10503 Intro to Turkic Languages III

(UZBK 10503; TURK 10503)

The second quarter of a two-section course in which Elementary Kazakh and Elementary Uzbek will be offered as one class, with the option for students to study one or the other, or both simultaneously.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Eurasia

RUSS 10600 Russian through Pushkin III

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

2020-2021 Spring

ARME 20103 Intermediate Modern Armenian III

This three-quarter sequence enables the students to reach an Intermediate level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The course covers a rich vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

ARME 20102 or equivalent.  

2020-2021 Spring

TURK 20103 Intermediate Turkish III

The course emphasizes comprehension by listening to parts of Turkish movies and songs, and self-expression both in written and spoken Turkish. Students write essays, summaries and scenarios. Turkish literature of increasing complexity will gradually be introduced.

2020-2021 Spring

POLI 20303 Second-Year Polish III

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

2020-2021 Spring

BCSN 20303 Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

The Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian languages and cultures course is designed for both students who have completed the first- year sequence and heritage learners. Its main objective is to develop further communicative skills—interpretive, interpersonal, presentational and intercultural—using authentic materials representing the contemporary spoken and written language in authentic cultural contexts. Students are presented with a series of texts, such as newspaper articles, interviews with writers, actors, athletes, short biographies, book and film reviews, university websites, travel blogs, etc. Audiovisual materials, representing both high and popular culture, constitute an integral part of every unit. Grammar and vocabulary are reinforced and developed throughout the quarter. Textual and audiovisual materials are selected to best exemplify the outlined themes while maintaining a good balance of the three languages and their respective grammatical and lexical differences in order to assess students’ progress in all four skills. Each of the 12 units is accompanied with a unit test, all of which, including the final exam at the end of the term, mirror the tasks in the practical proficiency assessment test that students can take at the end of the spring quarter. The course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans, guest speakers and cultural events. The prerequisite is BCSN 10303 or the equivalent. 

2020-2021 Spring

RUSS 20303 Second-Year Russian III

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

 

2020-2021 Spring

CZEC 20303 Second Year Czech-III

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

2020-2021 Spring

RUSS 20902 Third-Year Russian through Culture III

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

2020-2021 Spring

TURK 30103 Advanced Turkish III

Advanced Turkish students will develop their language skills in speaking, reading, translating, listening, and writing, while learning about Turkish society and culture at the same time. To address all of these aspects each class is divided into three sections which focuses on a specific skill.

2020-2021 Spring

TURK 30503 Ottoman Turkish III

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

2020-2021 Spring

RUSS 21302/30102 Advanced Russian through Media I

This is a three-quarter sequence designed for fourth- and fifth-year students of Russian. It is also suitable for native speakers of Russian. This sequence covers various aspects of advanced Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. This sequence emphasizes the four communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context. It builds transcultural competence by expanding students' knowledge of the language, culture, history, and daily lives of the Russian-speaking people. Vocabulary building is strongly emphasized. We add to the existing skills and develop our abilities to analyze increasingly complex texts for their meaning: to identify various styles and registers of the Russian language and to provide their neutral equivalents in standard Russian. We also work on developing our abilities to paraphrase, narrate, describe, support opinions, hypothesize, discuss abstract topics, and handle linguistically unfamiliar situations (in spoken and written format). Classes conducted in Russian. Course-specific grammar issues are covered during drill sessions (weekly) and office hours (by appointment). Oral Proficiency Interviews are conducted in the beginning and the end of the course (Autumn and Spring Quarters). Prerequisite(s): Four years of Russian, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

Four years of Russian, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

2020-2021 Autumn

RUSS 21402/30202 Advanced Russian through Media II

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

Four years of Russian, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

2020-2021 Winter

RUSS 21502/30302 Advanced Russian through Media III

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

2020-2021 Spring

BCSN 21104/31104 Advanced BCS: Language Through Fiction

(REES 21101, REES 31104)

This one quarter course is designed to help students over one of the most difficult hurdles in language training—the transition from working through lessons in a textbook to reading unedited literary texts. The selected pieces of fiction and the exercises drawn from them engage the language’s structure on every page. Immersed in a complete language experience, students learn how to engage the natural, organic language of literary texts across a variety of styles and themes enabling them to work with ever more challenging material. The course objective is to hone students’ abilities to analyze increasingly complex unrevised texts, identify various styles and registers of the language, and handle linguistically unfamiliar situations in both spoken and written format. Attention is given to improving students’ abilities to paraphrase, narrate, describe, support opinions, hypothesize and discuss abstract topics. Building vocabulary is stressed as a key to making progress, while issues of language structure and grammar are reinforced throughout the course. Classes are conducted in the target language and may be taken for pass/fail. 

The prerequisite is two years of formal study of the target language or the equivalent. 

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Eastern Europe

BCSN 21200/31200 Advanced BCS: Language Through Film

This course addresses the theme of Yugoslav and Post-Yugoslav identity through the discussion and interpretation of selected films, documentaries, images, and related texts—historical and literary, popular press, advertisements, screenplays, and literature on film. We examine the ways in which national identity and interethnic relations are approached, evaluated and critically dissected in films, subaltern television, musical performances (e.g. the Bosnian art movement New Primitivism, political documentaries, and more. Students view eight visual productions, each representing a different medium, author, region, and period. To begin, we screen the documentary Cinema Komunisto by Mila Turajlic (2012). This film is crucial for understanding how Yugoslav cinema was born and how, in its origins, it belongs to what cinephile Fredric Jameson has called a “geopolitical aesthetic.” We investigate the complex relationship between aesthetics and ideology in Yugoslav and Post-Yugoslav cinema, paying close attention to aesthetic conceptions and concrete formal properties and, more importantly, to language, narrative logic, and style. Classes are conducted in the target language and may be taken for pass/fail. The provisional weekly lesson plan is subject to change in order to accommodate additional needs and requests. 

The prerequisite is two years of formal study of the target language or the equivalent. 

2020-2021 Winter

BCSN 21300/31303 (Re)Branding the Balkan City: Comtemporary Belgrade/Sarajevo/Zagreb

(REES 21300; REES 31303)

The course uses an urban studies lens to explore the complex history, infrastructure and transformations of cities, mainly the capitals of today’s Serbia, Bosnia and Hercegovina, and Croatia. There is a particular need to survey this region and feed the newfound interest in it, mainly because Yugoslav architecture embodied one of the great political experiments of the modern era. Drawing on anthropological theory and ethnography of the city, we consider processes of urban destruction and renewal, practices of branding spaces and identities, urban life as praxis, art and design movements, film, music, food, architectural histories and styles, metropolitan citizenship, and the broader politics of space. The course is complemented by cultural and historical media, guest speakers, and virtual tours. One of them is a tour through the 2018 show at MoMA “Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia 1948-1980” a project curated with the goal to find a place for Yugoslav Modernism in the architectural canon. Classes are held in English. No knowledge of South Slavic languages is required.

2020-2021 Spring
Category
Eastern Europe

BCSN 21400/31403 Advanced BCS: Language through Art and Architecture

This course foregrounds different periods in Yugoslav and post-Yugoslav art and architecture. Situated between the capitalist West and the socialist East, Yugoslavia’s architects responded to contradictory demands and influences, developing a postwar architecture both in line with and distinct from the design approaches seen elsewhere in Europe and beyond. Drawing on the country’s own idiosyncrasies, diverse heritage and influences, the course surveys examples of architectural styles from classical to Baroque, through Art Nouveau and Modernism, all the way to full-blown Brutalism with its heft and material honesty. Given that Yugoslav architecture also expressed one of the great political experiments of the modern era, the course entertains many questions on related topics. While exploring major cities, their infrastructure, houses, buildings, monuments, churches and more, the course delves into advanced grammatical topics with the goal of increasing proficiency in both aural and reading comprehension, in addition to honing writing and speaking styles. Classes are conducted in the target language and may be taken for pass/fail

The prerequisite is two years of formal study of the target language or the equivalent. 

2020-2021 Spring

BCSN 21400/31403 Advanced BCS: Language through Art and Architecture

This course foregrounds different periods in Yugoslav and post-Yugoslav art and architecture. Situated between the capitalist West and the socialist East, Yugoslavia’s architects responded to contradictory demands and influences, developing a postwar architecture both in line with and distinct from the design approaches seen elsewhere in Europe and beyond. Drawing on the country’s own idiosyncrasies, diverse heritage and influences, the course surveys examples of architectural styles from classical to Baroque, through Art Nouveau and Modernism, all the way to full-blown Brutalism with its heft and material honesty. Given that Yugoslav architecture also expressed one of the great political experiments of the modern era, the course entertains many questions on related topics. While exploring major cities, their infrastructure, houses, buildings, monuments, churches and more, the course delves into advanced grammatical topics with the goal of increasing proficiency in both aural and reading comprehension, in addition to honing writing and speaking styles. Classes are conducted in the target language and may be taken for pass/fail

The prerequisite is two years of formal study of the target language or the equivalent. 

2020-2021 Spring

REES 25603/35603 Media and Power in the Age of Putin and Trump

Over the past 200 years, various political and cultural regimes of Russia have systematically exploited the gap between experience and representation to create their own mediated worlds--from the tight censorship of the imperial and Soviet periods to the propaganda of the Soviet period and the recent use of media simulacra for strategic geopolitical advantage. During this same period state control of media has been used to seclude Russia from the advancement of liberalism, market economics, individual rights, modernist art, Freud, Existentialism, and, more recently, Western discourses of inclusion, sustainability, and identity. Examining this history, it is sometimes difficult to discern whether the architects of Russian culture have been hopelessly backward or shrewd phenomenologists, keenly aware of the relativity of experience and of their ability to shape it. This course will explore the worlds that these practices produce, with an emphasis on Russia's recent confrontations with Western culture and power, and including various practices of subversion of media control, such as illegal printing and circulation. Texts for the course will draw from print, sound, and visual media, and fields of analysis will include aesthetics, cultural history, and media theory.

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Russia

REES 27019/37019 Holocaust Object

(ANTH 35035, HIST 33413, JWSC 29500)

In this course, we explore various ontological and representational modes of the Holocaust material object world as it was represented during World War II. Then, we interrogate the post-Holocaust artifacts and material remnants, as they are displayed, curated, controlled, and narrated in the memorial sites and museums of former ghettos and extermination and concentration camps. These sites which-once the locations of genocide-are now places of remembrance, the (post)human, and material remnants also serve educational purposes. Therefore, we study the ways in which this material world, ranging from infrastructure to detritus, has been subjected to two, often conflicting, tasks of representation and preservation, which we view through a prism of authenticity. In order to study representation, we critically engage a textual and visual reading of museum narrations and fiction writings; to tackle the demands of preservation, we apply a neo-materialist approach. Of special interest are survivors' testimonies as appended to the artifacts they donated. The course will also equip you with salient critical tools for future creative research in Holocaust studies.

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Eastern Europe

REES 27026/37026 Kieslowski: The Decalogue

(CMST 26705, CMST 36705, FNDL 24003)

In this course, we study the monumental series "The Decalogue" by one of the most influential filmmakers from Poland, Krzysztof Kieślowski. Without mechanically relating the films to the Ten Commandments, Kieślowski explores the relevance of the biblical moral rules to the state of modern man forced to make ethical choices. Each part of the series contests the absolutism of moral axioms through narrative twists and reversals in a wide, universalized sphere. An analysis of the films will be accompanied by readings from Kieślowski's own writings and interviews, including criticism by Zizek, Insdorf, and others. 

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Eastern Europe

REES 29013/39013 The Burden of History: The Nation and Its Lost Paradise

(CMLT 23401, CMLT 33401, HIST 24005, HIST 34005, NEHC 20573. NEHC 30573)

What makes it possible for the imagined communities called nations to command the emotional attachments that they do?  This course considers some possible answers to Benedict Anderson’s question on the basis of material from the Balkans. We will examine the transformation of the scenario of paradise, loss, and redemption into a template for a national identity narrative through which South East European nations retell their Ottoman past.  With the help of Žižek’s theory of the subject as constituted by trauma and Kant’s notion of the sublime, we will contemplate the national fixation on the trauma of loss and the dynamic between victimhood and sublimity.

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Eastern Europe

REES 29023/39023 Returning the Gaze: The West and the Rest

(CMLT 29023; CMLT 39023; HIST 23609; HIST 33609; NEHC 29023; NEHC 39023)

Aware of being observed. And judged. Inferior... Abject… Angry... Proud… This course provides insight into identity dynamics between the “West,” as the center of economic power and self-proclaimed normative humanity, and the “Rest,” as the poor, backward, volatile periphery. We investigate the relationship between South East European self-representations and the imagined Western gaze. Inherent in the act of looking at oneself through the eyes of another is the privileging of that other’s standard. We will contemplate the responses to this existential position of identifying symbolically with a normative site outside of oneself—self-consciousness, defiance, arrogance, self-exoticization—and consider how these responses have been incorporated in the texture of the national, gender, and social identities in the region. Orhan Pamuk, Ivo Andrić, Nikos Kazantzakis, Aleko Konstantinov, Emir Kusturica, Milcho Manchevski.

2020-2021 Winter
Category
Eastern Europe

REES 29024/39024 States of Surveillance

(CMLT 29024, CMLT 39024)

What does it feel to be watched and listened to all the time? Literary and cinematic works give us a glimpse into the experience of living under surveillance and explore the human effects of surveillance--the fraying of intimacy, fracturing sense of self, testing the limits of what it means to be human. Works from the former Soviet Union (Solzhenitsyn, Abram Tertz, Andrey Zvyagintsev), former Yugoslavia (Ivo Andrić, Danilo Kiš, Dušan Kovačević), Romania (Norman Manea, Cristian Mungiu), Bulgaria (Valeri Petrov), and Albania (Ismail Kadare).

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Eastern Europe
Russia

BCSN 29910/39910 Special Topics in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I

The course is designed to meet the specific needs of advanced learners of Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, including heritage and native speakers, and to foster cross-cultural experiences through interdisciplinary content. The curriculum covers a wide range of topics relative to the students' field of study, research and personal interests. Although grounded in the field of philology, it expands students' knowledge in other disciplines of social and behavioral sciences such as history, anthropology, global studies, economics, political science, sociology, and the like. Attention is given to the ability to paraphrase scholarly arguments, formulate research hypotheses, and present  research in the target language. The course delves into advanced grammatical topics with the goal of increasing proficiency in both aural and reading comprehension, in addition to honing writing and speaking styles. Classes are conducted in BCS. The prerequisite is three years of formal study of the target language or the equivalent.

Classes are conducted in B/C/S; the prerequisite is three years of formal study of the target language or the equivalent.

2020-2021 Autumn

BCSN 29911/39911 Special Topics in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II

The course is designed to meet the specific needs of advanced learners of B/C/S, including heritage and native speakers, and to foster cross-cultural experiences through its interdisciplinary content. The curriculum covers a wide range of topics relative to the students' field of study, research and personal interests. Although grounded in the field of philology, it expands students' knowledge in other disciplines of social and behavioral sciences such as history, anthropology, global studies, economics, political science, sociology, and the like. Attention is given to the ability to paraphrase scholarly arguments, formulate research hypotheses, and present one's research in the target language. The course delves into advanced grammatical topics with the goal of increasing proficiency in both aural and reading comprehension, in addition to honing writing and speaking styles. 

Classes are conducted in B/C/S; the prerequisite is three years of formal study of the target language or the equivalent.

2020-2021 Winter

BCSN 29912/39912 Special Topics in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

The course is designed to meet the specific needs of advanced learners of B/C/S, including heritage and native speakers, and to foster cross-cultural experiences through its interdisciplinary content. The curriculum covers a wide range of topics relative to the students' field of study, research and personal interests. Although grounded in the field of philology, it expands students' knowledge in other disciplines of social and behavioral sciences such as history, anthropology, global studies, economics, political science, sociology, and the like. Attention is given to the ability to paraphrase scholarly arguments, formulate research hypotheses, and present one's research in the target language. The course delves into advanced grammatical topics with the goal of increasing proficiency in both aural and reading comprehension, in addition to honing writing and speaking styles. 

Classes are conducted in B/C/S; the prerequisite is three years of formal study of the target language or the equivalent.

2020-2021 Spring

REES 42101 Collapse: The End of the Soviet Empire

(CDIN 42101, CMLT 42101, HIST 43802)

This team-taught course invites students to reassess critically the meaning of the Soviet collapse on the occasion of its thirtieth anniversary. Topics to be examined include the neoliberal "shock therapy" economic reforms that ushered in a state of wild capitalism, the dissolution of the Soviet empire and rise of rise of new right nationalisms, and the formation of alternative artistic movements that resisted the economic and political devastation that accompanied the transition. The course pedagogy employs economic, political, historical, and aesthetic analysis to develop a robust understanding across a variety of disciplines and methodological approaches.

Consent required for undergraduate enrollment; email Professors Feldman and Hillis a paragraph long description about what you bring and what you hope to get out of this seminar.

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Eurasia
Russia

REES 44001 Colloquium: Ending Communism

(HIST 44001)

This course focuses on the demise of one of the most enduring, ambitious, appealing, transformative, and destructive political ideologies. We will consider the collapse of communism as a religion, an aesthetic, and a way of life, an economic system and a material culture, a political structure and an international order. We will also discuss communism's afterlives in biographies and memoirs (including those of scholars). Topics include reforms and revolutions, political and cultural dissent, generations and languages, secrecy and publicity, travel and immobility, competing religions and rival ideologies, the Cold War and détentes, privileges and shortages, apartment blocks and palaces of culture, the Gorky Park, the Memento Park, and other Luna Parks. Our readings will range across Europe, focusing primarily on the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe in the last forty years of the twentieth century. 

Upper-level undergraduates with consent of instructor.

2020-2021 Autumn
Category
Eastern Europe
Russia

KAZK 10501 Intro to Turkic Languages I

(UZBK 10501; TURK 10501)

The first quarter of a two-section course in which Elementary Kazakh and Elementary Uzbek will be offered as one class, with the option for students to study one or the other, or both simultaneously.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Eurasia

YDDH 20100 Intermediate Yiddish I

This course offers students the opportunity to study the Yiddish language at the intermediate level. It reviews and extends students' knowledge of the grammar of the Yiddish language, enhances vocabulary, and includes literary and cultural readings. Designed to further develop listening, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing skills.

YDDH 10300 or consent of instructor. No auditors.

2019-2020 Autumn

ARME 10501 Intro To Classical Armenian

The course focuses on the basic grammatical structure and vocabulary of the Classical Armenian language, Grabar (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). It enables students to achieve basic reading skills in the Classical Armenian language. Reading assignments include a wide selection of original Armenian literature, mostly works by 5th century historians, as well as passages from the Bible, while a considerable amount of historical and cultural issues about Armenia are discussed and illustrated through the text interpretations. Recommended for students with interests in Armenian Studies, Classics, Divinity, Indo-European or General Linguistics.

2019-2020 Winter

YDDH 20200 Intermediate Yiddish II: Archival Skills

This course offers students the opportunity to study the Yiddish language at the intermediate level. The focus of this course is learning to navigate and study from a variety of archival materials including newspapers, music archives, and historical texts. The course is designed to further develop listening, speaking, reading comprehension, and writing skills and to give students tools to continue Yiddish reading and research independently.

YDDH 10300 or consent of instructor. No auditors.

2019-2020 Winter

REES 23708 Soviet History Through Literature

(HIST 23708)

This course considers the main themes of Soviet history through canonical works of fiction, with an occasional addition of excerpts from autobiographies, memories, and police files.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Eastern Europe
Eurasia
Russia

REES 24007 Chernobyl: Bodies And Nature After Disaster

(ENST 24007; GNSE 24007; HIST 24007)

When reactor number 4 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station exploded, it quickly made headlines around the world. Swedes found radiation in their air, Germans in their milk, Greeks in their grain, and Britons in their sheep. Ukrainians and Belarusians found it in their rain, wind, water sources, homes, and in their children's thyroids. Americans worried about finding it in their bodies, especially in pregnant or fetal bodies. A lot of roads led to the Chernobyl disaster: the Soviet state system, to be sure, but also the Cold War arms race, a faith in scientific progress shared in East and West, and a global disregard for the natural world and the human body. This course will follow those roads to the climax of the explosion and then examine the many paths out of Chernobyl: the disaster's aftereffects on geopolitics, environmentalism, feminism, and body politics. We will draw on a recent outpouring of scholarly and popular works on Chernobyl, including books, podcasts, and television series. We will also read texts on feminism, environmentalism, and other nuclear disasters, Cold War histories, and fiction to provide context and sites for further inquiry.

Peggy Odonnell
2019-2020 Winter
Category
Eastern Europe
Russia

REES 26012 Introduction to Russian Civilization II

(HIST 14000; SOSC 24100)

The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual, and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Russia

ANTH 22740 State and Public in Contemporary Turkey

(GLST 22740)

Perhaps no object of scholarly inquiry in Turkey has attracted as much attention as the 'state'. A central category in the construction of ideologies of authority, power, kinship and nationhood within Turkish society, the state has also emerged as a hotly contested subject of academic debate. At issue is the relationship of the Turkish state to broader publics, and the way that publics are constructed in relation to government institutions, mass media, consumer markets and forms of everyday sociality. In this course, we explore how scholars have theorized the relationship between state and public in Turkey, noting how their diverse scholarly orientations place Turkey in a unique position vis-à-vis academic knowledge production about Europe and the Middle East/Western Asia; and we consider how different methodological approaches and theoretical paradigms dominant in contemporary scholarship shape more prosaic concerns around education and language policy, political propaganda and mass media, bureaucracy and the politics of the public sector, fashion and the policing of public space, et al. At the same time, we focus on how these academic and policy debates are tied up with broader social concerns in Turkey and the wider region (as well as in Western Europe and North America) around democracy and authoritarianism, the relationship between secularism and Islam, the rights and status of religious and ethnic minorities, and shifting gender dynamics and generational change.

Patrick Lewis
2019-2020 Spring
Category
Eurasia

REES 23108 Contact Linguistics

(LING 26310; LING 36310)

This seminar focuses on current research in contact linguistics in a global perspective, including but not limited to the impact of languages of wider communication (e.g. English, Russian) in contact with other languages. Topics to be covered include the following: language/dialect contact, convergence and language shift resulting in attrition and language endangerment and loss. Other contact-induced linguistic changes and processes to be considered include borrowing, code-switching, code-shifting, diglossia, loss of linguistic restrictions and grammatical permeability, and the impact of language contact in the emergence and/or historical development of languages.

LING 20001 or consent of instructor

Salikoko Mufwene
2019-2020 Spring
Category
Eastern Europe

REES 20001/30001 War and Peace

( CMLT 22301; CMLT 32301; ENGL 28912; ENGL 32302; FNDL 27103; HIST 23704)

Tolstoy’s novel is at once a national epic, a treatise on history, a spiritual meditation, and a masterpiece of realism. This course presents a close reading of one of the world’s great novels, and of the criticism that has been devoted to it, including landmark works by Victor Shklovsky, Boris Eikhenbaum, Isaiah Berlin, and George Steiner.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Russia

NEHC 20160/30160 Central Asia Past and Present/From Alexander the Great to Al Qaeda

(ANTH 23616, ANTH 32206)

Central Asia Past and Present serves as a multi-disciplinary course, spanning anthropology, history and political science. This course introduces students to the fluid, political-geographic concept of Central Asia as well as to the historical and cultural dimensions of this particular and oft-redefined world. My understanding of Central Asia comes from studies of ex-Soviet Central Asia, which includes five independent countries (since 1991) within central Eurasia--the former U.S.S.R. Thus the course encompasses Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan in addition to parts of northern Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, and western China (Xinjiang/Sinkiang). Students will familiarize themselves with universal and divergent factors among the Central Asian peoples based on phenomena such as human migrations, cross-cultural influences, historical events, and the economic organization of peoples based on local ecology and natural boundaries. Working together and as individuals, we will study maps and atlases to gain a fuller understanding of historical movements and settlements of the Central Asian peoples.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Eurasia

NEHC 20502/30502 Islamic History and Society II

(HIST 25804)

This course is the continuation of Islamic History and Society 1 and presumes a familiarity of early Islamic history, 600-1100. This course covers the period from roughly 1000 to 1750 and deals with, among other topics, the coming of the steppe people (Turks and Mongols), the Mongol successor states, and the rise of the great early modern Islamic empires (Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals), the relation of Islamic political entities with Russia and China. Mid-term and final exam required for Undergraduates.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Eurasia

NEHC 20503/30503 Islamic History and Society III

This course covers the period from ca. 1750 to the present, focusing on Western military, economic, and ideological encroachment; the impact of such ideas as nationalism and liberalism; efforts at reform in the Islamic states; the emergence of the "modern" Middle East after World War I; the struggle for liberation from Western colonial and imperial control; the Middle Eastern states in the cold war era; and local and regional conflicts.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Eurasia

NEHC 20602/30602 Islamic Thought and Literature II

(HIST 25615 )

What are the major developments in thinking and in literature in the Islamic world of the “middle periods” (c. 950 – 1800 C.E.). How did noteworthy Muslims at various points and places think through questions of life & death, man & God, faith & belief, the sacred & the profane, law & ethics, tradition vs. innovation, power & politics, class & gender, self & other? How did they wage war; make love; shape the built environment; eat & drink; tell stories; educate their youth; preserve the past; imagine the future; perform piety, devotion and spirituality; construe the virtuous life and righteous community, etc.? How did these ideas change over time? What are some of the famous, funny, naughty and nice books read in the pre-modern Muslim world?
We will survey a broad geographic area stretching from Morocco and Iberia to the Maldives and India – even into the New World – through lectures, secondary readings and discussion. You will engage with a variety of primary texts in English translation, as well as various visual, aural and material artifacts. How do the ideas, institutions, and literary works evolve in response to changing historical, demographic and religious circumstances? How do culture, ethnicity, gender, history, politics and religion interact to create individual Muslim identities and a multi-faceted intellectual milieu (consisting of the scientific, philosophical and theological production; the religious, educational, governmental, commercial and social institutions; the literary, artistic, musical, and constructs which together make up "Islamic Civilization).

Islamic Thought & Lit-1

Franklin Lewis
2019-2020 Winter
Category
Eurasia

NEHC 20766/30766 Shamans and Oral Poets of Central Asia

This course explores the rituals, oral literature, and music associated with the nomadic cultures of Central Eurasia.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Eurasia

NEHC 20837/30837 Early Turkish Republic I

This course will examine the development of the Turkish state following WWI including questions of economy, institutions, and identity formation. The first quarter make be taken as a free-standing colloquium, or students may take both quarters and produce a research paper.

Open to graduate students and to upper division Undergraduates

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Eurasia

NEHC 20840/30840 Radical Islamic Pieties, 1200–1600

(HIST 25901)

This course examines responses to the Mongol destruction of the Abbasid caliphate in 1258 and the background to formation of regional Muslim empires. Topics include the opening of confessional boundaries; Ibn Arabi, Ibn Taymiyya, and Ibn Khaldun; the development of alternative spiritualities, mysticism, and messianism in the fifteenth century; and transconfessionalism, antinomianism, and the articulation of sacral sovereignties in the sixteenth century. All work in English. This course is offered in alternate years.

Some knowledge of primary languages (i.e., Arabic, French, German, Greek, Latin, Persian, Spanish, Turkish) helpful.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Eurasia

NEHC 30847 History of the Early Turkish Republic II

This is the continuation of NEHC 20837/30837: History Early Turkish Republic I. Students will produce a seminar/research paper and meet to discuss selected readings on the transition from Ottoman Empire to Turkish Republic and the consolidation of the Republican regime.

NEHC 20837/30837: History Early Turkish Republic I

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Eurasia

NEHC 30853 The Ottoman World in the Age of Suleyman the Magnificent

(HIST 58303)

This two-quarter seminar focuses on the transformation of the Muslim Ottoman principality into an imperial entity—after the conquest of Constantinople in 1453—that laid claim to inheritance of Alexandrine, Roman/Byzantine, Mongol/Chinggisid, and Islamic models of Old World Empire at the dawn of the early modern era. Special attention is paid to the transformation of Ottoman imperialism in the reign of Sultan Süleyman the Lawgiver (1520-1566), who appeared to give the Empire its “classical” form. Topics include: the Mongol legacy; the reformulation of the relationship between political and religious institutions; mysticism and the creation of divine kingship; Muslim-Christian competition (with special reference to Spain and Italy) and the formation of early modernity; the articulation of bureaucratized hierarchy; and comparison of Muslim Ottoman, Iranian Safavid, and Christian European imperialisms. The first quarter comprises a chronological overview of major themes in Ottoman history, 1300-1600; the second quarter is divided between the examination of particular themes in comparative perspective (for example, the dissolution and recreation of religious institutions in Islamdom and Christendom) and student presentations of research for the seminar paper. In addition to seminar papers, students will be required to give an oral presentation on a designated primary or secondary source in the course of the seminar.

Upper level undergrads with consent only; reading knowledge of at least 1 European Language recommended.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Eurasia

REES 22000/32000 Kafka in Prague

(GRMN 29600; GRMN 39600)

The goal of this course is a thorough treatment of Kafka's literary work in its Central European, more specifically Czech, context. In critical scholarship, Kafka and his work are often alienated from his Prague milieu. The course revisits the Prague of Kafka's time, with particular reference to Josefov (the Jewish ghetto), Das Prager Deutsch, and Czech/German/Jewish relations of the prewar and interwar years. We discuss most of Kafka's major prose works within this context and beyond (including The Castle, The Trial, and the stories published during his lifetime), as well as selected critical approaches to his work.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Eastern Europe

REES 24422/34422 Puppet, Robots, and Automatons: Animating the Inanimate Body

This course explores changing roles of puppets, robots, and automatons in the arts from the nineteenth century through the present. Major themes will include expressions of the anxieties surrounding animate inanimate objects, intersections between the arts and technology, constructed bodies in the context of both modernism and modernity, robots and automatons in utopian and dystopian spaces, and the relationship between puppets, robots, and automatons and developments in media through the past two hundred years. Readings for the course will historical and contemporary theoretical discourses on these constructed and imagined bodies, literary depictions ranging from folk tales through science fiction narratives, and discussions of puppets, robots, and automatons in the popular press. Beyond these texts, we will investigate how these figures are represented in film, theater, and the visual arts. Although we will consider sources and viewpoints from a broad geographical perspective, we will give special attention to the role of puppets, robots, and automatons in Central and Eastern Europe, where both nineteenth century romantic nationalism and twentieth century socialism fostered a distinctive discursive, technological, and creative space for the constructed, animated body.

Cheryl Stephenson
2019-2020 Spring
Category
Eastern Europe
Russia

REES 27003/37003 Narratives of Assimilation

(NEHC 20223; NEHC 30223; RLST 26623)

This course offers a survey into the manifold strategies of representing the Jewish community in East Central Europe beginning from the nineteenth century to the Holocaust. Engaging the concept of liminality-of a society at the threshold of radical transformation-it will analyze Jewry facing uncertainties and challenges of the modern era and its radical changes. Students will be acquainted with problems of cultural and linguistic isolation, hybrid identity, assimilation, and cultural transmission through a wide array of genres-novel, short story, epic poem, memoir, painting, illustration, film. The course draws on both Jewish and Polish-Jewish sources; all texts are read in English translation.

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Eastern Europe

REES 29009/39009 Balkan Folklore

(CMLT 23301; ANTH 35908; NEHC 30568; CMLT 33301; ANTH 25908; NEHC 20568)

Vampires, fire-breathing dragons, vengeful mountain nymphs. 7/8 and other uneven dance beats, heart-rending laments and a living epic tradition.This course is an overview of Balkan folklore from historical, political and anthropological, perspectives. We seek to understand folk tradition as a dynamic process and consider the function of different folklore genres in the imagining and maintenance of community and the socialization of the individual. We also experience this living tradition first-hand through visits of a Chicago-based folk dance ensemble, “Balkan Dance.”

2019-2020 Winter
Category
Eastern Europe

REES 29010/39010 20th Century Russian & South East European Emigre Literature

(CMLT 26912; CMLT 36912)

Being alienated from myself, as painful as that may be, provides me with that exquisite distance within which perverse pleasure begins, as well as the possibility of my imagining and thinking," writes Julia Kristeva in "Strangers to Ourselves," the book from which this course takes its title. The authors whose works we are going to examine often alternate between nostalgia and the exhilaration of being set free into the breathless possibilities of new lives. Leaving home does not simply mean movement in space. Separated from the sensory boundaries that defined their old selves, immigrants inhabit a warped, fragmentary, disjointed time. Immigrant writers struggle for breath-speech, language, voice, the very stuff of their craft resounds somewhere else. Join us as we explore the pain, the struggle, the failure, and the triumph of emigration and exile. Vladimir Nabokov, Joseph Brodsky, Marina Tsvetaeva, Nina Berberova, Julia Kristeva, Alexander Hemon, Dubravka Ugrešić, Norman Manea, Miroslav Penkov, Ilija Trojanow, Tea Obreht.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Eastern Europe
Russia

REES 29021/39021 The Shadows of Living Things: The Writings of Mikhail Bulgakov

(FNDL 29020)

“What would your good do if evil did not exist, and what would the earth look like if all the shadows disappeared? After all, shadows are cast by things and people…. Do you want to strip the earth of all the trees and living things just because of your fantasy of enjoying naked light?” asks the Devil. Mikhail Bulgakov worked on his novel The Master and Margarita throughout most of his writing career, in Stalin’s Moscow. Bulgakov destroyed his manuscript, re-created it from memory, and reworked it feverishly even as his body was failing him in his battle with death. The result is an intense contemplation on the nature of good and evil, on the role of art and the ethical duty of the artist, but also a dazzling world of magic, witches, and romantic love, and an irresistible seduction into the comedic. Laughter, as shadow and light, as the subversive weapon but also as power’s whip, grounds human relation to both good and evil. Brief excursions to other texts that help us better understand Master and Margarita.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Eastern Europe
Russia

REES 29815/39815 Russian Anarchists, Revolutionary Samurai: Introduction to Russian-Japanese Intellectual Relations

(CMLT 39710, EALC 39710)

This course introduces a current of Russian-Japanese exchange and cross-fertilization of ideas running from the late nineteenth century to now. Our focus will be on the historical role that Russia came to play in anarchist movement in Japan. We will read such revolutionary intellectuals as Lev Mechnikov, Peter Kropotkin, and Lev Tolstoy; compare the visions of civilizational progress of the state modernizer Fukuzawa Yukichi and Japanese anarchists Kōtoku Shūsui and Ōsugi Sakae; and study the post-WW II continuation of the anarchist tradition in the films of Kurosawa Akira, music of Takemitsu Toru, and writings of Ōe Kenzaburō.

2019-2020 Spring
Category
Russia

RUSS 29910/39910 Special Topics in Advanced Russian

Class meets for 2 hours each week. We'll work with several topics, all of them are relevant to the general theme of "Geography and Worldview: Russian Perspective". There will be maps, reading materials, several documentaries, clips from TV programs and other media, and feature films. Class meetings will be a combination of group discussions, short presentations, and lectures. Final - one term paper at the end (in English) based on Russian materials.

Must complete Advanced Russian through Media or equivalent, or obtain consent of instructor.

2019-2020 Autumn

REES 25005/45005 History Of International Cinema II

(ARTH 28600; ARTH 38600; ARTV 20003; CMLT 22500; CMLT 32500; CMST 48600; ENGL 29600; ENGL 48900; MAAD 18600; MAPH 33700)

The center of this course is film style, from the classical scene breakdown to the introduction of deep focus, stylistic experimentation, and technical innovation (sound, wide screen, location shooting). The development of a film culture is also discussed. Texts include Thompson and Bordwell's Film History: An Introduction; and works by Bazin, Belton, Sitney, and Godard. Screenings include films by Hitchcock, Welles, Rossellini, Bresson, Ozu, Antonioni, and Renoir.

Prior or concurrent registration in CMST 10100 required. Required of students majoring or minoring in Cinema and Media Studies. CMST 28500/48500 strongly recommended.

Staff
2019-2020 Winter
Category
Russia

REES 20020/30020 Pale Fire

(FNDL 25311, GNSE 29610, ENGL 22817)

This course is an intensive reading of Pale Fire by Nabokov.

Category
Eastern Europe
Russia